Donate Now to Support KDHX

Listen Live
Thursday, 15 August 2013 00:00

'Lee Daniels' The Butler' dramatizes racial history

'Lee Daniels' The Butler' dramatizes racial history                  ew.com
Written by Diane Carson
Rate this item
(0 votes)

About this Media...

  • Director: Lee Daniels
  • Dates: Opens August 15, 2013

Through the history of American racism and the civil rights movement, "Lee Daniels' The Butler" follows Cecil Gaines as a boy in 1926 Macon, Georgian cotton fields to life as a butler in the White House. From Eisenhower to Kennedy, LBJ to Nixon and Reagan, Cecil works in the background, his dignity and work ethic his own argument for, and proof of, equality.

In a parallel story, Cecil's older son Louis fights for his rights in Birmingham and Selma, sitting in at Woolworth lunch counters and on freedom rides. The history lesson encapsulated here reminds those of us who lived through it of the violence and vitriol. It informs those who didn't of the cruelty and struggles, integrating archival footage to document landmark moments. Each episode is a snapshot, an educational guide through a past that informs the present.

Based on the Washington Post's 2008 article by Wil Haygood on Eugene Allen, director Daniels moves from the Oval office to the dining room, the kitchen to the home with elegant fluidity. I applaud the endeavor for its comprehensive, intelligent presentation but also wish the film had more energy and drive, both sorely lacking in exchanges too restrained or calculated to convey meaning instead of being lived in. Similarly, the visuals sometimes lack crisp detail, and the sound contributes nothing unexpected or extraordinary.

There are several powerful scenes, notably Louis and others sitting at a whites-only lunch counter enduring racist insults and food thrown on them cross cut with Cecil serving an elegant, formal White House dinner. The assassinations of JFK and MLK are also handled well, the focus on the tragic events' devastating impact instead of reenactments, a wise choice.

As Cecil Gaines, Forest Whitaker brings his formidable presence and quiet charisma to the role. Oprah Winfrey, as his wife Gloria, must supply the counterpoint to Cecil's unwavering dedication. Winfrey is very good, her character too abbreviated in deference to the film's civil rights summary. Supporting actors add depth: Clarence Williams III, Terrence Howard, Lenny Kravitz. Some of the presidential portrayals seem just plain strange; but "Lee Daniels' The Butler," less imaginative and electrifying than I'd wished, delivers an essential reminder of our very recent racial history. Check local listings for theaters and times.

Sponsor Message

Become a Sponsor

Find KDHX Online

KDHX on Instagram
KDHX on YouTube
KDHX on SoundCloud
KDHX on Facebook
KDHX on Twitter
KDHX on flickr

KDHX Recommends

July
Friday
10

A Muscle Shoals Music Revue with Amy Black and Sarah Borges

Join powerhouse singers Amy Black and Sarah Borges for a soulful celebration of the incredible music that came out of Muscle Shoals, Alabama in the 1960s and 70s. Together, with a full band, they will perform classic songs originally...


July
Wednesday
15

Lunch Beat St. Louis #25 @ KDHX

Lunch Beat St. Louis is a free lunch time dance party to let you slip away from the everyday. Bring your co-workers, and bring your friends because for this party the bigger, the better. The music begins exactly at Noon and lasts...


July
Thursday
16

reMAKE

Music is an integral part of our human existence, but how we have listened to it has changed over the years. Even if you aren’t spinning your favorite tunes on records anymore, there are better things to do with all those audio...


Get Answers!

If you have questions or need to contact KDHX, visit our answers portal at answers.kdhx.org.

Online Users

3 users and 6802 guests online
Sign in with Facebook

SYSTEM: S5 Box

Login/My Account

Sign in with Facebook