Thursday morning music news: Prince pounds Fallon, Ramone recovers, Iggy ignites and Alvin Lee passes on

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Alvin Lee of Ten Years After has died at the age of 68.

This ain’t your nephew’s Grand Theft Auto: Snoop Dogg to star in a “rhythm-action, beat-matching combat experience,” aka a video game.

Yeah, SXSW Music is pretty freaking huge. Interactive is burgeoning as well.

From a mashup galaxy far, far away: “School House Rock” meets “Star Wars.”

Prince kills/destroys/annihilates (come up with your own verb) Fallon. Watch.

The story of Richard Hell and one very special book.

Washington University in St. Louis frat boys make really bad use of their time — and some rap lyrics.

Producer Phil Ramone has suffered an aortic aneurysm; he appears to be recovering well.

Fail of the week: Clueless wannabe mob guys try to sell $2 million Stradivarius for $150.

The forthcoming Cowsills documentary sounds amazing.

This will happen: The Hold Steady to contribute to “Game of Thrones” soundtrack.

The Quietus shares a stunning video of Fela Kuti live in Paris in 1984.

Moby auditions for the Postal Service. Watch.

The legendary Stompin’ Tom Connors as died at age 77.

Word on the street is that Beats by Dre and Apple have hooked up.

Listen to a new track by M83 from the sci-fi flick “Oblivion.”

Wu Tang Clan readies new album. Line of Best Fit has the scoop.

Dangerous Minds shares some gorgeous psychedelia from Thailand.

Behold: The science behind your crap-sounding MP3s.

Taylor to Amy and Tina: Burn in hell, bitches!

Noel Gallagher offers further evidence (yeah, I know) that rock/country/hip-hop/whatever stars should stop talking.

Iggy and the Stooges burn. Listen.

The Guardian UK chats with the peerless Emmylou Harris.

Robots play Ramones. Watch.

Thursday morning music news: Scott Weiland looks for work, Michael Nesmith looks down the road and Van Cliburn, Cleotha Staples and Magic Slim pass on

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The incomparable Van Cliburn has died at age 78.

Don’t mess with Pope Emeritus.

Google isn’t just sitting around while Spotify takes over the known musicverse.

The saga of Pussy Riot continues, with a few signs of reprieve.

Richard Street of the Temptations has died at the age of 70.

Nine Inch Nails map out reunion tour plans.

Not to be outdone, Michael Nesmith plans to hit the road for the first time in over 20 years.

$350K will buy you the house where “Born to Run” was written.

The Guardian UK pays homage to the late, very great Cleotha Staples.

What was Leonard Cohen doing in 1986? Making a cameo on “Miami Vice” for starters.

By the numbers alone, the recording industry is doing all right.

Leave it to the Coen Brothers to bring Marcus Mumford and Justin Timberlake together.

What do you get when you combine Aimee Mann and Ted Leo? #BOTH.

The Stone Temple Pilots have canned Scott Weiland. Mr. Weiland begs to differ.

Stereogum shares the first single from Yeah Yeah Yeah’s new album.

NPR’s First Listen hits the mother lode with previews of new albums by Youth Lagoon, Josh Ritter, Bajofondo and James Marshall Hendrix.

The “nice life” of David Bowie continues with 1) a new single and 2) smooches and cuddles from Tilda Swinton. Watch.

Big Brother has nothing on the Copyright Alert System.

Blues legend Magic Slim has died at the age of 75.

Iggy Pop picks a fight with Billy Corgan.

This is why I love Flavorwire.

And this is why I love the BBC.

Thursday morning music news: Billboard dives into the data, Jimi Hendrix gets the ‘Earth Blues’ and Mindy McCready and Kevin Ayers pass on

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Kevin Ayers, founder of Soft Machine, has died at the age of 69.

The redoubtable Resident Advisor takes a good hard look at industrial techno.

Billboard gives YouTube its blessing.

The new Atoms for Peace website has the most annoying design ever, but at least it’s streaming the new album.

Rolling Stone talks with Adam Ant about his struggles with bi-polar disorder.

Are we about to get another new David Bowie single?

Mindy McCready has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Attention twee bands: You and your ukes have some competition.

Nick Cave talks about his new album “Push the Sky Away,” which, like all his releases, has not “gone down the toilet.”

For Record Store Day, Stephen Malkmus opens up a can of Can covers.

Listen to a previously unreleased Jim Hendrix song, “Earth Blues.”

Mosh-pit physics could save us all.

The Bonnaroo lineup is out.

Ditto for the SXSW music showcase schedule.

The KDHX and Twangfest Day Parties at SXSW 2013 now have a complete lineup, and it’s pretty darn great.

Sophia Bush stars in the new Passion Pit video. Watch.

Early Beatles collaborator Tony Sheridan has died at the age of 72.

This really has been a sad week for the passing of musicians. Songwriter and producer Shadow Morton has died at the age of 71.

Everything you need (or dread) to know about the “Harlem Shake.”

One Direction has penetrated pretty much all corners of the teen-pop universe. Cavities are next.

Thursday morning music news: Mobb Deep regroups, Pacino does Spector and Cecil Womack and Reg Presley pass on

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Some rumors do pan out: Mobb Deep reunites.

And that MBV album is officially no longer a rumor. The Guardian UK reviews.

Wayne Coyne has your bloody (and chocolate) valentine right here.

George Clinton is not happy with Detroit rip-off artists.

Unsigned indie duo Macklemore and Ryan Lewis are #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Marianne Faithfull chats with Quietus about her 13 favorite albums.

According to Will Sheff of Okkervil River this is the greatest rock movie ever filmed.

Reg Presley of the Troggs has died.

Slate looks back at the Beatles’ recording session for their debut album.

The New York Times takes a good, literal look at Mozart.

Bummer. One of my go-to blogs is shutting down. The Stool Pigeon is flying the coop.

Sasquatch! lineup is out.

Robyn Hitchcock and Stereogum have a sit-down.

Noisy gathers up the very best of the very worst Kickstarter band campaigns.

RIP R&B great Cecil Womack.

The best. live. albums. ever. Or not, but at least there’s 40 of ‘em.

Spin reports on the return of Fall Out Boy.

The New York Times teases out My Morning Jacket’s Jim James’ love for N.W.A. and other stuff.

NPR chats with Douglas Brinkley about the publishing of Woody Guthrie’s sole — and previously-unknown — novel, “House of Earth.”

HBO teases its forthcoming Phil Spector biopic. Spoiler: Al Pacino wears some excellent wigs. Watch.

Thursday morning music news: Kendrick Lamar smokes SNL, Josh Ritter previews his new beast and Leroy ‘Sugarfoot’ Banner passes on

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Blackberry 10 has a Creative Director and her name is not Don Draper.

Congrats to Euclid Records NOLA for making Flavorwire’s list of most beautiful record stores in the world.

Johnny Cash. Stampified.

RIP Leroy “Sugarfoot” Bonner, frontman for the Ohio Players.

Dirty Projectors cover Usher. Watch.

Lance Armstrong is a creep, a weirdo and mashed-up.

We’ve been told the album is dead. Is the single next?

Cockroaches, however, will enjoy their cassettes long after we’re gone.

Josh Ritter is leaking all heck out of “The Beast in Its Tracks.”

Songwriting guru John Braheny has passed away at the age of 74.

Pitchfork has the scoop on the forthcoming Depeche Mode album.

The future of the iPod nano is in your DNA.

LouFest has a new logo and a new month.

Steve Earle is back with one new album and two new books.

Over 30,000 mourners march through the streets of Santa Maria, Brazil, where a nightclub fire took the lives of 231 people.

Sixteen years later, MMMBop is still catchy as hell.

Mixmag has details on the forthcoming MGMT album.

Apparently Björk has a purely “educational” Kickstarter.

I just couldn’t stop myself: Cat album covers, real vs. not so real.

The horrifying story of Kombo Kolombia.

Kendrick Lamar killed it on SNL.

Meet Professor Socks (aka Andrew Bird), the next superstar of kids music.

Thursday morning music news: The Eagles doc-rock, Madonna Jazzercises and Claude Nobs passes on

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“The Eagles documentary has landed.” Hat tip to the LA Times for the superlative headline.

The superlative Dangerous Minds digs up a video of Devo blowing minds in New York in 1977.

Al Jazeera reports on the struggle to rebuild a culture of music in post-Taliban Afghanistan.

Vibe rounds up the best MLK samples.

The Postal Service celebrates 10 years with a reunion and some new songs.

Adam Ant is back.

Ditto for Vampire Weekend. The band’s third album hits the streets on May 7.

The New York Times reports on a pretty amazing disco auction.

Get fit with Madge!

Hypebot charts the reach of online music services. Pandora is still king.

And these numbers prove why.

Claude Nobs, founder of the Montreux Jazz Festival, has died at the age of 76.

The beloved Annie Zaleski scoops up 10 perfect Cheap Trick songs.

I’ve got a whole lot of nada against Spain, but is it too late to move the Primavera Sound Festival to the Midwest?

The single most important question of the week is whether Beyonce lip-synced at the inauguration. Score one for Ms. Knowles-Carter.

KDHX’s latest live, in-studio sessions feature Tristen and Corb Lund.

Myspace 2.0/6.0/14.0 (who can keep track?) just hit a speed bump.

You’d think Lou and John would just kiss and make up already. You’d be wrong.

The Nashville Scene’s Country Music Critic’s Poll is out.

The “shuffling” dance craze appears to have taken over an otherwise quite sensible London.

But Sonia Sotomayor has the real moves.

The Mars Volta’s Omar Rodriguez-Lopez has a new band, Bosnian Rainbows. Listen.

Jerry Seinfeld raps. Technically this is an Onion headline, but that doesn’t mean it’s not for real.

Thursday morning music news: The AMA gets a makeover, Big Boi and André 3000 get together and the Flaming Lips get ‘Zaireeka’ back on the vinyl racks

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Congrats to the Beatles for reaching another milestone: public domain status in Europe.

Let’s say, for the sake of argument, that you’re the head honcho of a multi-national media empire, and said empire is bleeding cash to the tune of $190 million a year. Turns out, you’re laughing all the way to the bank.

The lines at Record Store Day just got longer.

Bad Religion hits the road — with a date at Pop’s in Sauget, Ill. on April 6 — and streams its forthcoming album, “True North.”

The Guardian scores a sit-down with Stevie Nicks.

The Americana Music Association gets a new mission statement.

John Wilkinson, guitarist for Elvis Presley and Springfield, Mo. resident, has died at the age of 67.

Download the new Big Boi and André 3000 reunion remix.

The soul-crushingly sad last night of Amy Winehouse.

Charley Patton, Blind Willie McTell and the Mississippi Sheiks — hipsterfied.

Chairman Mao — hipsterfied.

The fake Dan Bejar Twitter is probably better than a real one.

RIP Kent Abbott, guitarist for Grade and Somehow Hollow.

If there’s anyone left who cares, U2 has a new album coming out.

Martin Douglas tells what it’s like to be the only black guy at an indie rock show.

Meet Maura Johnston, the app.

Nobody does a list like the Dean.

Yeah Yeah Yeahs are back — and apparently have lost all leave of their graphic-design senses.

Joe Strummer gets a plaza in Spain.

Sammy Johns, of the one-hit-wonder smash “Chevy Van,” has died at the age of 66.

Here’s a new music biz model that works: Bandcamp’s “For Fans” network.

As if we didn’t have enough reasons to shut down Guantanamo.

Thursday Morning Music News: David Bowie returns, Wilko Johnson plays on and Patti Page passes away

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VVM properties the SF Weekly and the Seattle Weekly have been sold.

When David Bowie’s handlers do damage control on that wack new album cover it reads like a B+ lit-crit paper.

Meanwhile, Idolator makes itself useful and rounds up media reaction to the first single from “The Next Day.”

Dr. Feelgood guitarist Wilko Johnson has been diagnosed with terminal cancer.

NPR revs up the 2013 edition of “First Listen” with streams of new albums by Erin McKeown, Indians, and the Lone Bellow.

KDHX DJ Tom Ray reflects on the life and music of the late Fontella Bass.

DJ Shadow gets kicked off stage in Miami. Club apologizes.

Ann Powers goes under the radar for some anticipated albums of 2013.

Flavorwire rounds up 10 music documentaries you need to see this year.

Got a couple of hours to burn and a Replacements itch to scratch? “Color Me Obsessed” is ready.

Lemmy gets into the boutique headphone game.

Just when you think year-end listmania was over, Tone Deaf has one more head-scratcher.

The Grammy Awards lineup will include the Black Keys, Fun. and Mumford & Sons.

Patti Page, a grand vocalist and 100-million record seller, has died at the age of 85.

In anticipation of a new set of unreleased Townes Van Zandt recordings, Aquarium Drunkard shares a great, rare concert recording.

If Kickstarter isn’t the new model for record labels, what is?

Faster Louder audits the albums of Elvis Costello.

Overheard on a recent Interscope and MIA conference call: “Listen, Maya, we signed a provocateur. WTF with all this happy music?

Amazon debuts AutoRip cloud service.

The Philharmonia comes to the iPad.

Leonard Cohen is still on the road, and though no St. Louis date has been announced, he’s still freaking got it.

The enduring power of “In the Aereoplane Over the Sea.”

NPR tells the story of Mali musicians fighting the powers that be.

If Sufjan Stevens is going to sell out to Red Bull, it may as well involve people doing awesome things against the law of gravity.

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