Donate Now to Support KDHX

Listen Live

Playing games trumps 'Video Games: The Movie'

When I saw the title of the film "Video Games: The Movie," I thought, "Well, finally a documentary abo...

'Calvary' powerfully and profoundly probes sin and virtue

In the opening seconds of writer/director John Michael McDonagh's thought-provoking and unexpectedly funny "...

‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’ begins with chef’s step

If you’ve been led to believe that “The Hundred-foot Journey” is all about whatever character Helen...

'Guardians of the Galaxy' offers galaxies of fun

Just when I thought Hollywood's mega-budget, special effects extravaganzas couldn't get any more elaborate or...

'Rich Hill' is rich in complex profiles

Without sentimental indulgence, directors Andrew Droz Palermo and Tracy Droz Tragos profile three teenage boys in the...

This film needs sub-titles because either the actors are speaking Texan or they are mumbling or they are whispering. After a while, it hardly seems worth straining to hear what they're saying. It doesn't matter much because, in terms of action, the plot is not demanding. 

Published in Film Reviews

As incredible as it is inspirational, the documentary "Rising from Ashes" tells the story of Rwanda's first competitive bicycle team. While the tragedy of the 1994 genocide of an estimated one million Tutsis at the hands of the Hutus merited significant media coverage, little notice has been given to this amazing chapter worthy of international praise.
 

Published in Film Reviews

The good news about "Closed Circuit" is that neither its cloaks nor its daggers are cliches. The plot does not depend on justice prevailing but on reality reigning, so it is more cynical than triumphal. "Closed Circuit" is about terrorism and secrets, duplicity and circuity.

Published in Film Reviews

"The World's End" is not half-bad. The Britcom part, that is, the first half, is hilariously funny with lines a-poppin' all over the place. Then the zombies appear, and the lines fade to loud violence. If you like zombies, you'll like the second half of this film.

Published in Film Reviews

A few rare films manage to combine light-hearted comedy, absent mean-spirited put-downs, with substantive content. Writer/director Lake Bell's film "In a World" achieves that trifecta, providing very good laughs along with a look at father-daughter rivalry, sexism in the movie trailer business, and issues of self-esteem.

Published in Film Reviews

Based on the real life, innovative martial arts expert Ip Man, "The Grandmaster" focuses on beautifully choreographed fights showcasing various kung fu styles. A perfectionist, Chinese director Wong Kar-Wai edited "The Grandmaster" for over a year, and the flawless cuts, the fetishized details, and the flowing rhythm reflect his aesthetic sensibility and meticulous precision.

Published in Film Reviews

The main characters in "The Spectacular Now" say "Cheers!" a lot as they bump bottles, but they are not very cheerful. Sutter Keely is a teenage boy alcoholic, who lives in the now. Aimee is a teenage girl, who has been getting by on hard work, sci fi, and dreams of a college education. 

Published in Film Reviews

Names matter. The names of the protagonists, Alvin and Lance, in "Prince Avalanche" reveal a lot: old-fashioned Alvin plays by the rules -- even his overalls are strait-laced. He can skin a squirrel and set up a tent, neither of which Lance can -- or wants to -- do. 

Published in Film Reviews

Director Molly Bernstein's "Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay" accurately identifies what she delivers. Dominating this documentary from the first frame of his hands shuffling his beloved cards to his concluding performance of Shel Silverstein's wonderful poem "The Game in the Windowless Room," Ricky Jay keeps his mysteries to himself while generously praising mentors.

Published in Film Reviews

Capturing the rise and fall and rise of Apple’s co-founder and sometime CEO Steve Jobs, director Joshua Michael Stern’s film “Jobs” uses deadpan humor, sharp dramatization, an energetically moving camera and fine-tuned editing to craft a multifaceted portrait. Avoiding the usual hagiography, this biopic foregrounds terrific acting while hitting the familiar highs points of the iconic company’s history.

Published in Film Reviews

Through the history of American racism and the civil rights movement, "Lee Daniels' The Butler" follows Cecil Gaines as a boy in 1926 Macon, Georgian cotton fields to life as a butler in the White House. From Eisenhower to Kennedy, LBJ to Nixon and Reagan, Cecil works in the background, his dignity and work ethic his own argument for, and proof of, equality.

Published in Film Reviews

"There are only so many traumas you can withstand before they find you on the street talking to yourself." Truer words were never spoken, and spoken they are, along with thousands of other words by the woman known as Jasmine. She was born Jeannette, but she changed her name, so her name is a lie.

Published in Film Reviews

An extraordinary and chilling documentary, "The Act of Killing" chronicles exactly that in unprecedented ways. Several Indonesian men reenact, unabashedly, even proudly, ways they brutally tortured and murdered individuals in the 1965-66 purge primarily of communists, among other targeted groups such as local Chinese workers. Some killers now hold office, with no punishment for their heinous acts.

Published in Film Reviews

You don't have to be an Anglophile or even a history buff to appreciate "The Audience." You don't have to know the politics of England since 1952 or be able to name the dozen prime ministers who served at the pleasure of the Queen since she ascended the throne. You just have to know a brilliant play when you see one.

Published in Film Reviews

For anyone who loves animals or has any empathy, director Gabriela Cowperthwaite's documentary "Blackfish" is as heartbreaking as it is challenging to our definition of humane and intelligent treatment of animals in captivity, especially those that perform for audience's pleasure and businesses' profit. Posing critical questions, "Blackfish" scrutinizes orca whales trained and presented by SeaWorld Entertainment.

Published in Film Reviews

Describing herself as a political theorist because of her interest in the communal, not the individual, Hannah Arendt is well known for her observations on "the banality of evil." German director Margarethe von Trotta's film "Hannah Arendt" fully interrogates that concept, putting it into a full, complex context.

Published in Film Reviews

Sponsor Message

Become a Sponsor

Find KDHX Online

KDHX on Instagram
KDHX on YouTube
KDHX on SoundCloud
KDHX on Facebook
KDHX on Twitter
KDHX on flickr

Local Artist Spotlight


The Mound City Slickers

Mon August 4

The Driftaways

Mon July 28
The Driftaways are a seven-man reggae band hailing from St. Louis. Their E.P. "Don't Hide" is full of high-energy jams and groovy improvisations that give the band's music a good-time vibe. Download their…

KDHX Recommends

August
Friday
29

Small Black, Scarlet Tanager

KDHX welcomes Small Black to the Ready Room, with Scarlet Tanager. This event is all ages.


August
Saturday
30

Cave States at Harvest Sessions 2014

Cave States at Harvest Sessions 2014 Cave States makes its debut live performance at Harvest Sessions this week. The acoustic Americana band features veteran St. Louis musicians Danny Kathriner, Chris Grabau, Todd Schnitzer, John Higgins and John Horton. This free...


September
Friday
05

Art Outside

Art Outside is not an ordinary fair, but one that features art, music and plenty of food and drink from Schlafly Beer. Hosted at the brewery’s Bottleworks location in Maplewood, Missouri, Art Outside draws approximately 15,000...


Get Answers!

If you have questions or need to contact KDHX, visit our answers portal at answers.kdhx.org.

Online Users

3 users and 13563 guests online
Sign in with Facebook

SYSTEM: S5 Box

Login/My Account

Sign in with Facebook