Donate Now to Support KDHX

Listen Live

Bob Wilcox

Thursday, 06 December 2012 02:48

'The Night Season': Another three sisters

Something about a family of three sisters must fascinate playwrights, they pop up so often. Patrick Kennedy, the father of three daughters in Rebecca Lenkiewicz's The Night Season, compares his three not to Chekhov's or Wendy Wasserstein's or Beth Henley's three but to King Lear's daughters.

Monday, 12 November 2012 23:36

They glow

At the turn of the 20th century, radium was celebrated as a miracle drug. We know today that radiation can be useful in treating cancer and other diseases. We also know that radiation can cause cancer and other diseases. Back then, a few successes in treating cancer led to a fad for putting radium in a variety of tonics that were supposed to be good for whatever ailed you.

Monday, 12 November 2012 23:20

This business is dying

Somebody at R-S Theatrics likes weird. Last year, they produced a staged reading of Andrew Hinderaker's play Suicide, Incorporated. Now they're doing a fully staged production of Suicide, Incorporated. Actually, it's not that much more fully staged that the previous, pretty fully staged one – well staged in both cases.

Monday, 12 November 2012 23:01

The ties that bind

A lot of terrific acting happens in English playwright Chloe Moss's This Wide Night on the West End Players Guild's stage in the Union Avenue Christian Church. Things can get pretty intense in the 90 minutes or so of this two-character play.

Monday, 05 November 2012 23:41

Those funny Southerners

Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope, and Jamie Wooten have made careers – one could say an industry – out of writing comedies about an ethnic group that it is safe to laugh at, Southern whites, usually Texans.

Monday, 05 November 2012 23:31

It's never who you think

Detective-Inspector Frost failed to solve the apparent kidnapping and probable murder of a baby a dozen years ago in a small English village. Now he's returned to Waverton to try to finish the job before he retires. Welcomed on his first visit, now nobody wants him around.

Monday, 05 November 2012 23:09

That's a winner

Fences fills the 1950s slot in August Wilson's magnificent creation of plays for each decade of the 20th century. For me, it is one of the best.

Monday, 29 October 2012 22:48

Lest we forget

Janet Langhart Cohen, who wrote the current Black Rep production Anne and Emmett, has had a distinguished career as a television journalist. She knows a good story when she sees it, and she knows how to tell it clearly. She knows how to make her thoughts about the story clear, too. And she knows that she must hold her audience's attention.

Monday, 01 October 2012 22:04

A record for fun in 'The Drowsy Chaperone'

"The Drowsy Chaperone" is, deliberately, a silly musical. It is a silly musical "within" as its subtitle says, "a comedy." The musical purports to be from the 1920s. The comedy is from today. It has one character. The musical is his favorite show, and he plays his LP of the show for us, magically evoking the original cast to perform it for us.

Tuesday, 18 September 2012 00:57

Dousing an old flame: Remember Me?

Sam Bobrick has done a lot of writing for TV. You suspect that watching his play Remember Me?, recently at the Theatre Guild of Webster Groves. Remember Me? is well crafted, funny, and slight. It's set in a prosperous apartment in the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The central couple are middle-aged, well-to-do, bright and articulate.

<< Start < 1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 > End >>
Page 4 of 17

Sponsor Message

Become a Sponsor

Local Artist Spotlight


The Mound City Slickers

Mon August 4