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Jason Warren

As I stepped into the Old Rock House this past Friday night, the pre-show music wasn't random. To diehard fans of guitarist and songwriter Adrian Belew the sounds of the Tom Tom Club, David Bowie, Frank Zappa and the Talking Heads were eerily familiar.

Wednesday, 01 October 2014 11:00

Matisyahu 10/1/14

Streaming Audio

Matisyahu brings his Jewish heritage and new music into the lexicon of reggae. His new album "Akeda" still finds him exploring his faith and expanding his music vocabulary with reggae dominating his soul.

Grand Center bustled with activity Friday night. Within a two-block radius, Wynton Marsalis christened the newly remodeled Jazz at the Bistro, Ringo Starr and his All-Starr Band brought back memories at the Fabulous Fox, and nestled just around the corner, tucked away on Washington Avenue, Marty Stuart and his Fabulous Superlatives held court at the Sheldon Concert Hall. As Marsalis is to jazz, Stuart is to classic country music: the music of myth and legends, too numerous to be listed.

A stop at the "Bluegrass Shack" with a mention of the name John Prine elicited a distinctive response from Earl, who sat behind the counter: “He's a legend.” With that thought in mind, Prine fans, including plenty of St. Louis singer-songwriters and KDHX DJs, filled the Touhill Performing Arts Center on Friday night.

Sunday night at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater was the perfect date night for guitar players, geeks and dorks. The double bill of Jeff Beck and ZZ Top gave guitar players and their significant others, the best of both worlds. The musical wet dreams from Beck's fingers were for the six-stringed daydreamers, while the "Tube Snake Boogie" of ZZ Top gave everyone a reason to shake their booties.

The clear August night might have been a sign of the apocalypse or good fortune as Dave Alvin took the stage at Off Broadway with his brother Phil.

On any given Saturday night in St. Louis there is a triple bill of great local sounds pouring from the doors of any given club. This past Saturday night at the Heavy Anchor was no exception.

A little bit of Texas heat found its way into the Old Rock House on an unseasonably cool St. Louis July night. Billy Joe Shaver, the original “Honky Tonk Hero,” took the stage, bringing his history, unique brand of song and storytelling to an audience of neo-urban cowboys, greasers, hipsters and anyone faithful to '70s outlaw country.

A long-distance call comes in across the digital airwaves emanating from the West Coast: "Hi, this is Chuck." His voice is easily recognizable, the same voice as heard on songs like "Sonny Liston's Blues," "Willie Mays Is up at Bat" and "Doubter Out of Jesus (All Over You)." The man behind the voice is Chuck Prophet, a musician with a career that spans the days of jamming econo in the Paisley Underground with Green on Red, working in the surreal world known as Nashville and essentially altering the rock 'n' roll landscape for some four decades.

The dimly lit room of mostly blue lights and an urban industrial vibe created peculiar warmth as Mike Keneally, bassist Doug Lunn and Drummer Gregg Bendian took the stage at the Demo Friday night.

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