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Old and new, borrowed and blue--all the elements are there in the St. Louis Symphony's evening of Brett Dean's "Lost Art of Letter Writing" and Brahms' "Symphony No. 1".

Published in Reviews

If you consider his entire output, Johannes Brahms was an early bloomer. He reportedly wrote his first piano sonata at the age of 11, was touring as a pianist by 19, and was only 20 when Schumann sang of his virtues, calling him "a young man over whose cradle Graces and Heroes have stood watch". Heady stuff.

If you consider his entire output, Johannes Brahms was an early bloomer. He reportedly wrote his first piano sonata at the age of 11, was touring as a pianist by 19, and was only 20 when Schumann sang of his virtues, calling him "a young man over whose cradle Graces and Heroes have stood watch". Heady stuff.

The symphony's "Beethoven Festival" continues this week with a powerful reading of Beethoven's "Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, op. 55," (the "Eroica") and brilliant performances of two new works composed by viola soloist Brett Dean, one of which is inspired by Beethoven.

Wednesday, 22 January 2014 17:46

Symphony Preview: Old and new testament

This weekend's St. Louis Symphony concerts continue the "Beethoven Festival" as David Robertson returns to the podium for the first time in the new year to conduct a newly minted viola concerto and two works directly related to Beethoven's famous 1802 "Heiligenstadt Testament."  One—the "Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, op. 55," known as the "Eroica"—is by Beethoven and the other by the composer of the viola concerto, Brett Dean.  Neat bit of theme programming, that.