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Displaying items by tag: Julianne Moore

In "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay -- Part 2" Katniss Everdeen continues her noble, determined commitment to secure democracy and ensure livable conditions for Panem's workers. This final installment in the series rather abruptly ties up some of the plot points and shuttles off problematic characters, some given a fitting send off, some dismissed too cavalierly. I doubt the fans will mind.

Published in Film Reviews
Friday, 16 October 2015 00:00

'Freeheld' argues for equality for all

Equality is all Laurel Hester wants in 2002 Seaside Heights, New Jersey. She has served the county for years, an exemplary police detective, who's felt the need to hide the fact that she's a lesbian, even from her police partner. A diagnosis of terminal cancer and her desire to bequeath her pension benefits to her domestic partner will change everything.

Published in Film Reviews

Imagine being a woman of words -- literally, a professor who makes her living studying words -- who loses those words. Not just a momentary stutter until the word returns, shining like new, but lost for words forever. That is the basis of Lisa Genova's novel of the same name and of this good film.

Published in Film Reviews

The latest installment in "The Hunger Games" franchise, "Mockingjay -- Part 1," works hard to ramp up plot intensity, all the while building to a resolution that will come only a year from now in "Part 2." That it succeeds as well as it does comes largely from Jennifer Lawrence's charisma as Katniss Everdeen: strong, self-confident, and principled.

Published in Film Reviews

The child asks for a lullaby, and the mother complies. She sings “Rock-a-bye, Baby,” a little ditty that lulls in melody but not lyric. The words, about infanticide and fear, set the scene for “What Maisie Knew.” Maisie is the child, her mother is full of the words of love but not the actions. 

Published in Film Reviews

The St. Louis Psychoanalytic Institute's Celluloid Couch series at Webster University concludes Thursday, May 19th with co-writer/ director Lisa Cholodenko's The Kids Are All Right with analysis provided after the screening by Lenita Newberg. Teenage siblings Joni and Laser live with their two mothers, Jules and Nic.

Published in Film Reviews

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