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The Peabody Opera House embraced the spirit and hope of the holiday season by staging a fantastically colorful and heart-warming version of "Elf, the Broadway Musical" that thoroughly entertains audiences of all ages. The show is a fast-paced romp that reminds us to be open to love and life's possibilities while encouraging us to reconnect with our sense of childlike wonder.

Published in Theater Reviews
Thursday, 03 December 2015 11:48

'All Is Calm' reminds us that peace is possible

Mustard Seed Theatre once again brings the musical "All Is Calm" to St. Louis audiences for the holiday season. The story, based on actual events that transpired on Christmas Eve and Day along the front lines of World War I, is an inspiring, moving tale. A combination of songs and monologues pulled from soldiers' letters, the show quietly but forcefully reminds audiences that the holiday season is also about "peace on earth" and "goodwill to men."

Published in Theater Reviews

The Fox Theatre kicks off the holiday season with a romantic comedy musical filled with favorite tunes from Irving Berlin's beloved songbook. The Work Light Productions interpretation of the exuberantly positive story and songs rings in the season with a smile.

Published in Theater Reviews

Stray Dog Theatre takes a chance by opening its season with the little known musical "Dogfight," but it's a risk that pays off handsomely. This poignant coming of age tale unfolds in early 1963, before three young marines head to service and, eventually, Viet Nam. The coming war, and the naiveté of the young recruits, looms large, but in 1963 the conflict was not yet the Viet Nam War as contemporary audiences understand it. "Dogfight" takes place before the protests and the controversy of the draft, when the small Asian country was unknown to most Americans and the situation considered merely a conflict. Even the young recruits are uncertain just where they're headed or why.

Published in Theater Reviews

New Line Theatre kicks off its season, the first at their new home in the smartly renovated Marcelle Theater on the east end of Grand Center, with a bang. A little poison and a big bomb are also included in the dark comedy, but it's the heart, and a prescient message about teen isolation, mental health and violence, that may stay with audiences.

Published in Theater Reviews

Rodgers and Hammerstein's beloved "Oklahoma!," running through August 16, 2015, is bursting with memorable songs and energetic dances, and performed with affection, humor, and precision by the MUNY cast and ensemble. A show this deeply ingrained in our collective memory can be tough to produce, but the MUNY's production delivers the familiar with affection in a bright, quick-paced show that mostly hits all the right notes.

Published in Theater Reviews

Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine give fairytales a clever musical score, along with an abundance of whimsy and a gentle moral, in the tuneful, imaginative "Into the Woods." Already high on the list of Sondheim's popular musicals, the production is engaging for audiences of all ages, with a few unexpectedly adult situations and a slightly subversive sense of humor. The result is a bittersweet tale, touched by both harsh and comforting realities, that delivers its lessons with a light touch and hopeful tone.

Published in Theater Reviews

There was a time, not so long ago, when a band called Union Tree Review was making its mark on the St. Louis indie-music scene. Headed by a forlorn crooner named Tawaine Noah, UTR added furious, gnarled guitar, relaxed viola to hash out Noah's ruminations on loss.

Published in Music News

In 1959, at the age of 22 and just as his career was taking off and stardom seemed assured, influential songwriter and rock and roll pioneer Buddy Holly died tragically in a plane crash. The MUNY's current production of "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story" is a rousing, high energy tribute to the prolific musician that highlights not only his status as an early rock icon, but also his contributions to the civil rights movement as demonstrated through both his actions and a genuine appreciation for the music that developed from the African American blues tradition.

Published in Theater Reviews

The musical "Hairspray," based on the John Waters' movie of the same name, uses the styles, culture, music, and civil rights movement of the 1960s to flip an exuberant middle finger to a lot of "isms" that are, unfortunately, still present in everyday America. The lighthearted musical demonstrates, with an abundance of humor and insight, just how silly people look when they let superficial qualities, like race or size, determine their relationships with others.

Published in Theater Reviews
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